PLEASE NOTE:

WCF IS CASH ONLY NO PUBLIC FACILITIES ON SITE

 

 WILSON'S CREEK FARM 

Located on the corner of West Bypass and Grand St. in Springfield, MO.


CLOSED for the Season. 


Thank you to all that visited.  See you next year!

U-Pick Blueberries!


FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK 

 

OUR FARM YOUR TABLE

Produce grown for consumption, not production. 

Family owned and operated, Wilson's Creek Farm will offer six different varieties of blueberries.

Duke

Being a more tart variety, duke blueberries are great for baking! 

Bluejay 

Great for freezing and canning.

Patriot

Big, juicy-sweet berries. 

Bluecrop

Great right off the bush – perfect balance between sweet and tart. 

Blueray

 Tangy, sweet flavor; excellent with desserts. 

Legacy

Medium-sized fruit with superior flavor and sweetness!

In addition to blueberries, we plan to offer a variety of vegetables, including; cabbage, peppers, and green beans.

PLEASE NOTE: WCF IS CASH ONLY




 
succlent 3.jpg

SUCCULENTS

houseplant2.jpg

HOUSEPLANTS

cabana corner cropped.jpg

CABANA

 

HOW TO PICK RIPE BERRIES

When harvesting Blueberries, select plump, full berries with a blue color. A berry with a hint of red is not fully ripened.  Blueberries don’t actually reach their full flavor until a few days after they turn blue, so a tip to know which ones are the best is to tickle the bunches lightly – only the true ripe ones will fall into your hand

STORING AND FREEZING

 After blueberries are picked, store blueberries unwashed for a few days in the refrigerator in layers of paper towels and covered in plastic wrap up to five days.  

Blueberries also freeze very well and once defrosted, can be used identically to fresh berries in almost any way.  Freeze Blueberries unwashed in single layers on cookie sheets, then move them to plastic bags or freezer containers,  this keeps the berries from getting crushed.  Because unwashed blueberries freeze individually, they can be easily poured from containers in desired amounts. 


Remember both frozen and fresh berries should be rinsed and drained just before serving. Just before using, wash the berries in cold water.

Ingredients

  • 2 eggs large

  • 1 and 1/2 cups buttermilk

  • 2 tsp vanilla extract optional

  • 3 TBSP melted butter

  • 1 and 1/2 cups all-purpose flour

  • 1/2 tsp salt

  • 2 tsp baking powder

  • 1/2 tsp baking soda

  • 2 TBSP sugar

  • 1 cup blueberries 

Instructions

  1. Heat a large frying pan over medium-low to medium heat . Grease the pan with oil or butter. When it's hot enough, a drop of water will skitter across the surface, evaporating immediately.

  2. whisk together the flour, salt, baking powder, baking soda and sugar, set aside.

  3. Whisk together the eggs, buttermilk and vanilla until light and foamy.  Whisk in the melted butter.

  4. Add the dry ingredients to the wet ingredients, stirring just to combine.  Don't over mix, a few lumps are fine.

  5. Pour the batter in 1/4 cupfuls onto prepared pan. sprinkle 1-2 tablespoons of berries on top. 

  6. Cook the pancakes until bubbles start to form on top and the sides start to set, 2-3 minutes.  Flip and cook for another 2 minutes, or until golden brown.

  7. Serve right away, or keep on a baking sheet fitted with a cooling rack in a 200 degree oven. Serve with more blueberries, butter and maple syrup.

 

HISTORY OF WILSONS CREEK

Brig. General Nathaniel Lyon’s Army of the West was camped at Springfield, Missouri, with Confederate troops under the commands of Brig. General Ben McCulloch approaching. On August 9, both sides formulated plans to attack the other. About 5:00 am on the 10th, Lyon, in two columns commanded by himself and Colonel Franz Sigel, attacked the Confederates on Wilson’s Creek about 12 miles southwest of Springfield. Rebel cavalry received the first blow and fell back away from Bloody Hill. Confederate forces soon rushed up and stabilized their positions. The Confederates attacked the Union forces three times that day but failed to break through the Union line. Lyon was killed during the battle and Major Samuel D. Sturgis replaced him. Meanwhile, the Confederates had routed Sigel’s column, south of Skegg’s Branch. Following the third Confederate attack, which ended at 11:00 am, the Confederates withdrew. Sturgis realized, however, that his men were exhausted and his ammunition was low, so he ordered a retreat to Springfield. The Confederates were too disorganized and ill-equipped to pursue. This Confederate victory buoyed southern sympathizers in Missouri and served as a springboard for a bold thrust north that carried Price and his Missouri State Guard as far as Lexington. In late October, a rump convention, convened by Governor Claiborne Fox Jackson, met in Neosho and passed an ordinance of secession. Wilson’s Creek, the most significant 1861 battle in Missouri, gave the Confederates control of southwestern Missouri.

Learn more: The Battle of Wilson’s Creek - August 10, 1861

 

CONTACT US

 

WILSON'S CREEK FARM

417.866.0261

3326 W Grand St Springfield MO United States 65802

©2018 BY WILSON'S CREEK FARM.